From the Sources

Beginning to Pray

Anthony Bloom writes about kavanah (honesty, sincerity and focus) from a Christian perspective.


From the Sources

The Ebb and Flow of D'vequt (Clinging to God)

The founder of Hasidism, the Baal Shem Tov, considers the inevitable ups and downs in one’s spiritual life.


From the Sources

Prayer Not "From" but "To" the Heart

The English word “prayer” derives from the Latin for “beg, entreat or request.” One would expect something similar in Hebrew, but tefillah literally means “to judge oneself.” Rabbi Shimshon Rafael Hirsch, father of Modern Orthodoxy, offers a compelling, if troubling, explanation.


From the Sources

Keva vs. Kavanah: Obligation of the Heart

What is more important: to pray according to one’s prescribed duty as defined by Jewish law (keva), or to pray only when the heart is engaged (kavanah)? Two sages weigh in.


From the Sources

Praying for Others

The third century, Babylonian rabbi Rav, comments on a person who only prays for
his or her self.